Structure 150, subterranean kiva

About this Structure

General Location

Central portion of site.

Specific Location

East-central portion of Architectural Block 100; 490N 545E; 490N 547E; 492N 545E; 492N 547E.

Interpretive Type

Living room.

Structure Use

Structure 150 is similar to other kivas occupied during the Early Pueblo III period and was probably used for domestic and ritual activities. The presence of a hearth (Feature 1) indicates a domestic use of the structure and would have been used for light, heat, and food preparation. Pottery, chipped stone, a maul, manos, and plant remains on the floor of Structure 150 indicates a domestic use of the structure as well. The presence of a floor vault (Feature 14) indicates that this structure had a ritual function. The floor vault was sealed with secondary refuse by A.D. 1100-1140 and covered by the construction of Surface 2. Floor vaults are not common features in residential architecture and may indicate that the occupants of Structure 150 held a unique position within the community. Only one other kiva excavated at Albert Porter Pueblo, Structure 108, contained a floor vault which was also sealed in the Pueblo III period. The pilasters in Structure 150 were are unique in that they contained sockets for horizontally placed wood spanning pilaster to pilaster. The pilasters in Structure 150 resemble the pilasters in Kiva B at Lowry Pueblo. This architectural trait is not common in residential architecture and may also indicate that the occupants of Structure 150 held a unique position within the community.

Abandonment

Structure 150 was intentionally burned at abandonment. The burned roof collapsed on to the structure floor and was covered by Nonstructure 151 refuse deposits. Several manos and vessels were left on the structure floor at abandonment. Corn cobs and chenopodium seeds (probably in a vessel that broke when the roof caved in) were present in great quantities at abandonment. The chenopodium seeds had "popped" in the structural fire, suggesting that the seeds contained moisture and were recently harvested. Chenopodium seeds are harvested in Autumn, therefore Structure 150 was most likely burned in the Autumn.

Postabandonment

Natural wind and water sediments accumulated above Nonstructure 151 secondary refuse deposits.

Excavation Details